Available Darkness Episode 2, Interview with Hugh Howey, Free ForNevermore, and a Z 2134 update

Available Darkness Episode 2, Interview with Hugh Howey, Free ForNevermore, and a Z 2134 update

Hey Fellow Goners, Dave here with this week’s very late newsletter. First, I apologize for the lateness. Sean and I have been working double-time on something top secret that we’re going to announce soon. Hint: It has to do with our zombie serial, Z 2134, which you may recall that we took down just a couple of days after it first went live. Z 2134 WILL BE back, but it won’t be for a couple of weeks. Sean and I will tell you more the minute we’re able to. But it’s good news. This week we’re bringing you Available Darkness: Episode 2. You can get it here: US: www.amazon.com/dp/B009H508P6/ UK: www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B009H508P6/ If you already read the original AD book we released in August 2011, you can skip the first season (the first six episodes) over the next few weeks. Unless you either really loved the story and want to read the revised version to see how we’re making it better. As I said last week, though, it’s not necessary to re-read the first season because we’re not changing the events which occurred in the book you already read. If you haven’t read AD yet, now’s the perfect chance to hop on board. It’s got all the action, chills, mystery, and WTF endings you’ve come to expect from us. And it’s a whole new take on vampires — I mean completely different. WHAT IT’S ABOUT… Available Darkness follows a man who wakes up buried alive with no memory of his past. In his pocket is a note telling him to avoid the police, avoid the sunlight, and don’t touch anyone....
The Collective Inkwell Interview: Emma Newman

The Collective Inkwell Interview: Emma Newman

Emma Newman is the author of the soon-to-be-published Twenty Years Later, her debut young adult fiction novel set in a post-apocalyptic future, which she has been podcasting since last year. She lives in Somerset, England with her husband and two year old son. Though he’s an only child, she considers him her second child – the first baby being her novel. Emma runs her own copywriting and online PR business called Your Nisaba, named after the Sumerian goddess of writing and knowledge. Nisaba was launched in 2009. She drinks far too much tea, and finds the little real life she spends time in, a curious mixture of terrifying and wonderful. Longtime readers of Collective Inkwell may recall that Emma won our first Online Fiction Contest, the prize being our redesign of her website. Last week, Emma released an ebook collection of some of her short stories (see the great cover pictured a bit further down in this story). 1. When did you start writing and what inspired you (also, what kind of stuff did you first write)? I started writing stories at the age of four according to my grandmother. I wrote all the time until a short story got me into Oxford University when I was 17. That created a block that lasted for ten years! Then I began to write again and the first draft of Twenty Years Later poured out of me over 26 days. I barely felt in control of it. My poor husband was a writing widow. Inspiration? There was no inspiration to write as far as I recall. It was as natural as...
The Collective Inkwell Interview: Joel Schwartzberg

The Collective Inkwell Interview: Joel Schwartzberg

Our interview today is with writer and TV producer, Joel Schwartzberg, the author of The 40-Year-Old Version: Humoirs of a Divorced Dad. The book, a series of thought provoking and humorous essays on his journey of becoming a better dad following his divorce, also touches on a subject that is both controversial and not talked about much, male depression following the birth of a child. We talk with Joel about his book, his creative process, the dangers of public confession of personal thoughts and about the controversy surrounding an article he wrote in Newsweek about male depression. How did you get started in writing? I’ve always loved to write – I even get a thrill out of addressing envelopes.  Having lovingly dabbled in essay writing in high school and college, I suddenly decided to see just how good I was (read: if I could make any money by merely writing). I sent a few sample pieces to my local paper who took me on as a weekly columnist. My pieces commingled with gardening tips and bat-mitzvah announcements, but I was proud and it gave me great confidence to aspire higher. After taking a Mediabistro course, I was ready to write and submit to larger magazines and newspapers. Getting published in The New York Times Magazine was a big deal, and gave me the boost I needed to keep both my ambition and my standards on a very high shelf. Since then I’ve been in Newsweek, The Star Ledger, The New York Post, The New York Daily News, Babble.com, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and lots of regional parenting magazines,...
The Collective Inkwell Interview: Brian Anderson of Dog Eat Doug

The Collective Inkwell Interview: Brian Anderson of Dog Eat Doug

Welcome to the first Collective Inkwell interview. Our aim is to showcase the most creative bloggers, writers and artists working on the web today. We kick things off with an interview with cartoonist Brian Anderson of the syndicated comic strip Dog Eat Doug. Anderson’s strip follows the adventures of Sophie, a cheese-loving chocolate Labrador and her owner’s baby, Doug. The popular strip is cute, imaginative and at oftentimes laugh-out-loud funny. If you’re a parent or dog owner, or daring enough to be both, you’ll swear that Anderson is spying on you to come up with his ideas. In addition to newspapers and the web, Dog Eat Doug can also be found in a print collection at your local book store or online. You can also follow Brian Anderson on Twitter. Among topics for discussion, Anderson talks about his creative process, how he uses social media to promote his work and the effects of the economy on syndicated comics. Please give a warm Collective Inkwell welcome to Brian Anderson. What inspired Dog Eat Doug? My chocolate Lab, Sophie, was the original inspiration. I didn’t have my baby boy at that time. So all the baby stuff I made up. Lot’s of image searches for toys, high chairs and numerous other baby products. Now I just look around my living room. How much of your real life seeps into the strip? A lot. The strip is more of a documentary at this point. My wife has gotten used to everyday occurrences showing up in the strip. Describe your comic creating process. Everything starts in notebooks. Ideas, doodles, storylines and new characters...