Game of Thrones, Being a King, and Howard Stern

Game of Thrones, Being a King, and Howard Stern

(note: We’ve decided to post our newsletters here on the blog every week for those who haven’t yet subscribed, and those who are just happening upon our blog for the first time. However, if you want to join the Goners and get free stories and exclusive sneak peeks when we offer them, you’ll need to sign up to join our FREE newsletter.) Hey Goners, Dave here with this week’s missive from the Writer’s Cave. Do you watch Game of Thrones? If you’re not watching it, I urge you to start. HBO is on Season Two now, so you definitely want to start with Season One. It’s one of the most complex, enjoyable shows I’ve seen in a long time. One of the most enjoyable aspects of the show (and the book series it is based on, A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin) is how you get the story from so many perspectives. You find yourself identifying, loving, and hating people in different sides of the same war. As you can tell from Yesterday’s Gone and WhiteSpace, we’re kinda big into alternating POVs. Martin was interviewed in this week’s Rolling Stone and he was asked about his characters. He said something I loved. I’m paraphrasing here, but essentially, he said, people have different favorites. But one of the best things is how readers write to him having very different opinions on his characters. A character hated by some is loved by others. And vice versa. And Martin said if all your letters say the same thing about the same characters, then you know you’ve written a...

Self Publishing And ISBNs: All You Need To Know

Catherine Caffeinated has a must-read post for anyone who is confused over ISBNs. One area of this whole self-publishing, Print On Demand, e-book thing that seems to still be mired in confusion is the whole question of ISBNs. I myself am still confused about it, so let’s see if we can work it out all, shall we? I’ve mined the magical interweb for the answers to my ISBN questions, but they aren’t always presented in the most straight-forward way. Some of the questions she answers: Do you need an ISBN for a Kindle or Smashwords e-book? Do you need one for a self-published hard copy at Createspace? Should you use a free ISBN or your own? What’s the advantage (and cost) to using your own? And lot’s more. Check out her post, which will clear up any ISBN-related questions you...

Self Publishers: Are You Making This Mistake?

Amazon has recently updated the Kindle to show accurate page numbers to match the print versions of books, which is vital for referencing pages. But how do you know which e-book version matches which print version? If a new edition is released, it could be out of sync with the e-book. And that’ just one of the copyright page errors that Self Publishing Review highlighted in a recent post. So I started my study. I picked 30 ebooks and analyzed their copyright pages. Somebody must have missed the memo about what information is required and what format it should be presented in because we had a variety of formats and information, to say the least. Although 30 ebooks is not a very big sample, only one of them came close to what is needed to ID the source. Amazon has seen the need to add the source information in their on-line product description to help. They have added a line: Page Number Source ISBN. But my ebooks didn’t have a clue to the original source. Read the whole post...

Author Paves Own Road To Success

When it comes to writing success, more authors are finding an audience when they’re willing to go out and build one. That’s what Craig Lancaster, a journalist and author with two books, is doing. Lancaster’s first book, 600 Days of Edward, was borne from the NaNoWriMo challenge, after a motorcycle accident injury. “I’m really very excited how Craig reaches out to his readers, goes into livingrooms, does his blog tour.” Lancaster said marketing is one of the things that takes a writer away from his work. But in today’s publishing world, it’s something all authors must do. Besides Lancaster’s active Twitter feed, blog and website, he’s taking “The Summer Son” on a “blog tour,” visiting other writers’ blogs and reaching out to a wide audience. Read the whole article...

Do You Settle? Are You A Writer Or A Publisher?

Chazz Writes has an inspiring post which asks a very important question – do you pick up pennies? As writers, too many of us settle for rejection all too easily. The timing isn’t right. The market isn’t right. Our work isn’t right. We get in a rut and lose faith. We settle. While we usually like to summarize posts at Collective Inkwell, this might be a case where you’re better off just going to the post and reading for...
Beck: A Model of Achieving Success Without Selling Your Soul

Beck: A Model of Achieving Success Without Selling Your Soul

My bookshelves were once wobbly with cool music. Then I had children. I no longer have the time, resources or stamina to keep up with sonic gems as I once did. Like many parents, my time is now restricted and my auxiliary hobbies reduced. But I will always make time for Beck. When he comes out with something new, I buy it. Why? Because Beck is an exciting artist. He’s always interesting and has never let me down. His music is instantly warm, familiar, and each time not quite like anything I’ve heard before. Isn’t that the type of author you’d like to be? Your model doesn’t have to be Beck. He’s a good example for me because I’ve always been drawn to his music and style. I’m sure you have your own artist. The artist you love probably shares many of these qualities. Beck Followed His Muse When Beck signed with Geffen for less money than other labels were offering, it was because they offered him creative control. Good move. Beck’s spent his career marching to the beat of his own drum and millions of fans have remained marching behind. He’s continued to make the music he wants to, enjoy his choice of collaborators, and follow his own artistic blueprint. When it comes to your art, make sure you’re the one making the rules. Of course, you should listen to constructive criticism, but ultimately it’s your art. Bending it to make others happy will warp its individuality. Be Persistent Beck was living on the streets when he was signed. I remember reading a interview in BAM!, a now-defunct...